Hi-Heel Sneakers

COMING UP!

Thursday 13 December 10.45am – Hi-Heel Sneakers – Morals, Motown and Milkshakes in the early 60s

As part of the Crouch End U3A series of monthly meetings I’ll be talking about the music, coffee bars, and fashion of the Sixties, and how young working-class people made their way in a rapidly changing and uncertain world. It’s the Christmas meeting so there will be mince pies and tea and coffee. There will be one or two cracker jokes from the 60s and a load of really good pictures. I’m doing a power point and I’ll do some readings from The Saturday Girls and A Sense of Occasion, and maybe even the new book! working title currently The Greenway Girls.

Union Church and Community Hall, Weston Park, N8 9TA  –  doors open 10am

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Hi-Heel Sneakers

I’m on the Robert Elms show on BBC Radio London today at 10.30 am (94.9FM) to talk about The Saturday Girls, mods, Motown and milkshakes. The big question is – when you’re going on the radio, does it matter what you wear? In bed, before I got up, I played Hi Heel Sneakers – one of the best records to put on the juke box in the Orpheus, the mods’ coffee bar in Chelmsford, a song that conjures up the excitement, the breathlessness, the cool of being a mod. I was looking for sartorial tips.

On the basis of Tommy Tucker’s advice I should wear a red dress, a wig hat and the hi-heel sneakers. It is of course a look, but perhaps it had to be 1964, in a cellar bar with very low lighting for it to work.

Is it important to wear the right clothes for any given situation, even if no-one can see you? I think so – I once represented a client in a case where the judge needed to check something as she was drafting the order, and she rang me up at home. I was in my pyjamas! It was not an easy conversation, calling someone ‘Judge’ when you’re glancing down at your slippers. Clothes are vital.

So what shall I wear today (did I mention I’m on the Robert Elms show this morning? 10.30am)? Sometimes I wish my mum hadn’t thrown away my suede (when I was 35 and hadn’t lived at home for over 15 years). A suede coat covered a multitude of sins – the not-quite-Fred Perry, the slightly wrong colour twin-set or simply the wrong blouse.

Yes, the book is out and people are saying good things about it. People have taken snaps of it on the shelves at Sainsbury’s, as far apart as Winchmore Hill and Chelmsford (well, they have to sell it in Chelmsford). My sister was on holiday and two of her friends were reading it! Of course, they may have felt they had to, but it was a nice gesture. My sister herself read it and said it was like being back in our living room in the Sixties (it is, of course, a novel Tess!).

But back to the far more pressing issue of clothes for this morning’s broadcast. I shall wear something dark but cool, straight but well cut, the sort of thing we dreamed of in those days, but never quite knew how to put into words. Or afford.

Let Tommy Tucker say it for me.

The Saturday Girls – countdown

In four weeks time The Saturday Girls will be on the shelves.

I really enjoyed writing the book, much as I really enjoyed those days. How iconic they were, and still are. Everyone has a story to tell about the early Sixties. Yesterday I was in a local coffee shop talking to someone who is at least ten years younger than me. We talked about a whole range of things – starting with her excellent choice, in this hot heavy weather, of iced coffee. Somehow, as it always does, the conversation turned to the early Sixties – mods and rockers and Italian style and the French New Wave and scooters and suede coats. And she had memories of those days. I mentioned the Milk Bar – in Chelmsford that was Wainwrights, on the corner of London Road and Tindal Street. And she, who had grown up in the Midlands, suddenly remembered their local Milk Bar, and its reputation for being a wild and crazy place that your mum wouldn’t want you to go to. I said the word ‘scooters’ and she had a story about riding on the back of a Vespa, and holding on tight.

That’s the book really. What I’ve tried to do is take you back there – so you too can remember those days of Motown and Minis and Cathy McGowan and her Cleopatra hair style. Even if you weren’t there, as you follow the paths of Linda and Sandra, dancing to Georgie Fame at the Corn Exchange and drinking frothy coffee in the Orpheus, and as you meet Sylvie, the most exotic person on the Estate, who has actually been to Paris – you’ll remember.

And it’s so close now. Things are heating up! My editor tells me I shall soon have a copy of the book to hold in my hands. And then it will climb onto the shelves of the shops.  And then you’ll be able to read it. As the Temptations said, ‘Like a snowball rolling down the side of a snow covered hill, it’s growing.’

You can of course pre-order your copy here!

Getting around

Brent Cross 2014 (1)

 

 

 

 

 

I am often asked – what was it like in those days, to ride on a scooter, with the wind in your hair, swooping round corners?*

And I say – it was great, it was wild, it was cold.

Tell me more – they say.

And I answer -well, if you really want to know, get yourself up to Brent Cross and find the coffee bar of your dreams.  Slip onto the seat, order a Horlicks, and away you go.

photo 1

Is it a Vespa?  Is it a Lambretta?  Does it matter?

For the full effect you would probably need to take a hair dryer that blows cold as well as hot.  Train it gently on your hair and feel Free!

If you have a little music with you, I say, that would be good too.  The Beach Boys.  Sometimes you had to question their sartorial choices, but they had one of the sounds of the 60s.  They got around.

Who knew that Brent Cross could be so … mod?  It is of course, Christmas.

Brent Cross Xmas 2014

*In fact, I have never been asked this, but for the purposes of this post, I am prepared to step inside the minds of those who can only stand, silent.  This, I know, is what they want to know.